21st Century skills needed by students


  • What skills should students acquire to prepare for future jobs that do not yet exist?
  • What are the resources needed by educators to help prepare their students for the 4th Industrial Revolution?

 

Students of today are rushing into the 21st Century, a new chapter in human development, driven by a set of extraordinary technologies (“4th Industrial Revolution”). They will experience shifts in cooperation and competition. They will contribute to and reap the benefits of the creation of entirely new systems of value production, exchange and distribution.

According to a panel of experts from the World Economic Forum, twelve clusters of technologies are evolving so rapidly and will massively change the world that we know today. They are:

  1.  New Computing Technologies,
  2. Blockchain & Distributed Ledger Technologies,
  3. The Internet of Things,
  4. Artificial Intelligence and Robotics,
  5. Advanced Materials,
  6. Additive Manufacturing and Multidimensional Printing,
  7. Biotechnologies,
  8. Neurotechnologies,
  9. Virtual & Augmented Realities,
  10. Energy Capture, Storage and Transmission,
  11. Geoengineering,
  12. Space Technologies.

Technologies (1-3) extends digital technologies, transforming the way we store, manipulate and communicate information.

Technologies (4-6) reforms our physical world, by providing new materials for our environment and introducing digital agents and actors that will cross the boundary between software and devices.

Technologies (7-9) will alter the human being, by operating within our own biology, enhancing our physical abilities and changing the way we interface with the world.

Technologies (10-12) connects us, the planet, and the wider universe, providing us ways to redevelop infrastructure and perform global systems maintenance.

 

S.T.R.E.A.M. & LIFE SKILLS

How do students prepare for 21st Century life, and for jobs that do not yet exist?


 

Data from the U.S. Department of Commerce shows that STEM (Science Technology Engineering Maths) jobs are growing at a rate of 17% per year compared to 9.8% for other occupations. Like the U.S., many countries are facing the same trends, and STEM education became a focus in schools. This is because businesses everywhere were having difficulty finding graduating students with the necessary skills to stay competitive.

In the 21st Century, economies are driven by innovation, and the creativity and communication nurtured through the Arts. Hence STEAM (Science Technology Engineering Arts Maths) education is becoming more prevalent in top schools. 

St. Uriel Education has added Robotics to STEAM, resulting in STREAM (Science Technology Robotics Engineering Arts Maths) education as we believe that Robotics provides students with fundamental skill sets (eg. coding, and man machine interface), that teaches them logical thinking, problem-solving skills and creativity amongst others. More importantly, it cuts across multiple technologies and helps students to have a mindset of adaptation to rapidly changing technologies and how this affects the systems around them. 

Finally, it is worth remembering that technologies and societies continuously shape each other. Technologies are solutions and products developed through social processes that already reflect ingrained priorities and values. St. Uriel Education incorporates Life Skills education to STREAM education because we want to help develop future leaders who can:

• Identify the values that are tied up with particular technologies.
• Understand how technologies impact human choices and decision making on a daily basis.
• Determine how to best influence technological development with an appropriate set of stakeholders.

 

The St. Uriel Education Method

How do schools, educators and parents help students become leaders of tomorrow?


 

Developed by a panel of experienced educators and industry experts, the cutting edge St, Uriel Education Method utilizes different innovative pedagogies that allows schools, educators and parents to explore ways of teaching, learning, and assessment. Carefully crafted STREAM lesson plans incorporate “Learning through play” and important elements of Life Skills. Each lesson plan is benchmarked against the NGSS (Next Generation Science Standards) and the UK education and technologies standards.

“Learning through play” helps students to learn and make sense of the world and technologies around them – they develop social and cognitive skills, mature emotionally, and gain the self-confidence required to engage in new technological experiences.

Through St. Uriel Education‘s benchmarked robotics lessons, students will be active and involved in their learning. Robots allow students to learn through first-hand experiences – because the purpose of play-active learning is that it motivates, stimulates and supports children in their development of skills, concepts, language acquisitions, communication skills and concentration. It provides opportunities for students to develop positive attitudes and to demonstrate awareness/use of recent learning, skills and competencies, and to consolidate learning.

Schools, educators and parents can make use of St. Uriel Education lesson plans to train the students in school or in the comforts of your own home.

These lesson plans contains:

• Guidelines for the activities to be performed.
• Solutions and suggestions for assessments.
• Benchmarks showing what the students have learned for each lesson.
• Hardware and software needed for the robots.
• Online and offline resources to help educators and parents assess the learning outcomes of each lesson.
• Robotics Competitions.

 

 

 

 

STEM Education in Asia

STEM Education in Singapore

STEM is part of the Applied Learning Programme (ALP) that the Singapore Ministry of Education (MOE) has been promoting since 2013, and currently, all secondary schools have such a programme. It is expected that by 2023, all primary schools in Singapore will have an ALP. There are no tests or exams for ALPs. The emphasis is for students to learn through experimentation – they try, fail, try, learn from it and try again. The MOE actively supports schools with ALPs to further enhance and strengthen their capabilities and programmes that nurtures innovation and creativity.

The Singapore Science Centre established a STEM unit in January 2014, dedicated to igniting students’ passion for STEM. To further enrich students’ learning experiences, their Industrial Partnership Programme (IPP) creates opportunities for students to get early exposure to the real-world STEM industries and careers. Curriculum specialists and STEM educators from the Science Centre will work hand-in-hand with teachers to co-develop STEM lessons, provide training to teachers and co-teach such lessons to provide students with an early exposure and develop their interest in STEM.

St. Uriel Education, a specialist curriculum developer that was founded in Singapore and having active presence in China and Thailand, integrates Robotics and Arts into STEM curriculum – ie. STREAM (Science Technology Robotics Engineering Arts and Maths). Their curriculum is aligned with the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), and each lesson illustrates life-skills, universal values and ethics. Their research based curriculum attempts to not only develop 21st Century Skills, but also men and women who can do good and add value to the communities that they live in.

 

STEM Education in China

To promote STEM in China, the Chinese government issued a guideline in 2016 on national innovation-driven development strategy, instructing that by 2020, China should become an innovative country; by 2030, it should be at the forefront of innovative countries; and by 2050, it should become a technology innovation power.

In February 2017, the Ministry of Education in China has announced to officially add STEM education into the primary school curriculum, which is the first official government recognition of STEM education. And later, in May 2018, the launching ceremony and press conference for the 2029 Action Plan for China’s STEM Education was held in Beijing, China. This plan aims to allow as many students to benefit from STEM education as possible and equip all students with scientific thinking and the ability to innovate. In response to encouraging policies by the government, schools in both public and private sectors around the country have begun to carry out STEM education programs.

However, in order to effectively implement STEM curricula, full-time teachers specializing in STEM education and relevant contents to be taught are needed. At present, China lacks qualified STEM teachers and a training system is yet to be established. Many Chinese public and private schools have for the last few years sent their principals and top teachers for STEM curriculum development courses in Singapore, conducted by St. Uriel Education (a top STEM curriculum specialist, employing cutting edge education robotics, coding, and incorporating important elements of life skills, values and ethics that benefit students).

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STEM Education in Thailand

In 2017, Thai Education Minister Dr Teerakiat Jareonsettasin said after the 49th Southeast Asia Ministers of Education Organisation (SEAMEO) Council Conference in Jakarta that the meeting approved the establishment of two new SEAMEO regional centres in Thailand. One would be the STEM Education Centre, while the other would be a Sufficient Economy Learning Centre.

Teerakiat said that the Thai government had already allocated Bt250 million over five years for the new STEM centre. The centre will be the regional institution responsible for STEM education promotion. It will not only set up policies to improve STEM education, but it will also be the centre for information and experience sharing among the member countries and education experts. According to him, “This is the first SEAMEO regional centre for STEM education, as the existing science education centre in Malaysia only focuses on the academic perspective. Our STEM education centre will also prioritise the implementation and adaptation of science and technology.”

Thailand government schools have been hampered by budget, but those private international schools have done an outreach to secure training for their STEM teachers and have explored the conduct of such training using latest robotics technologies and coding – such as those offered by St. Uriel Education.

The Institute for the Promotion of Teaching Science and Technology (IPST) has initiated a STEM Education Network whose objectives are to encourage integrated learning activities and enhance student creativity and application of knowledge in daily or professional life, and to establish a collaborative network of public and private organisations and personnel in promoting STEM education in Thailand.

This network includes the National STEM Education Centre, 13 Regional STEM Education Centres, which were founded last year, schools in the STEM Education Network and other supporting networks. Regional STEM Education Centres are located in large-scale secondary schools in selected provinces, each centre works as a hub of academic support for teachers and educational personnel in the region and disseminates the STEM education concept in its areas of responsibility. These centres also act as a co-ordinating agency linking IPST, local personnel and institutes in basic and higher education, as well as other public and private organisations.

Each of the 13 STEM Education Centres is a centre for six satellite schools in their locations: two primary schools, two secondary schools and two opportunity extension schools. In Bangkok, there are two centres: Bodindecha School and Samsenwittayalai School. The STEM Education Network also consists of subordinate networks and systems to support the operation of the major units. These include the Academic Mentor University Network, Supervisor Network, Academic Mentor Network, STEM Ambassador network, STEM Personnel Recognition Program and iSTEM Resource Centre.

 

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